The Court of Justice delivered on 7 April 2022 its judgement in case C‑236/20 (PG), which is about the working conditions of the Judges of the Peace in Italy. Progressively, with this case and previous ones on working conditions of judges, along with several judgments on the Rule of Law (e.g. touching on the recruitment of judges, or disciplinary proceedings against judges), the Court of Justice is building a European framework of the status of judges.

“1. Article 7 of Directive 2003/88/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 November 2003 concerning certain aspects of the organisation of working time, Clause 4 of the framework agreement on part-time work […] and Clause 4 of the framework agreement on fixed-term work […] must be interpreted as precluding national legislation which does not provide for an entitlement for magistrates to 30 days’ paid annual leave or to a social security and pension scheme deriving from the employment relationship, such as that provided for ordinary judges, if that magistrate comes within the definition of ‘part-time worker’ within the meaning of the framework agreement on part-time work and/or ‘fixed-term worker’ within the meaning of the framework agreement on fixed-term work and is in a comparable situation to that of an ordinary judge.

2. Clause 5(1) of the framework agreement on fixed-term work […] must be interpreted as precluding national legislation pursuant to which a fixed-term employment relationship can be renewed a maximum of three times successively, each renewal being for a duration of four years, for a total duration that does not exceed 16 years, and which does not provide for the possibility of penalising in an effective and dissuasive way the abusive continuance of the employment relationship”.

Source: https://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf?text=&docid=257484&pageIndex=0&doclang=EN&mode=req&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=2654588